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JAPANESE LONGTAILS:

ONAGADORI
SHOKOKU
OHIKI
MINOHIKI
TOTENKO
KUROKASHIWA
SATSUMADORI

CHINESE LONGTAILS

KOREAN LONGTAILS

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LONGCROWERS:
KOEYOSHI
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DENIZLI
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BERAT
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OTHER BREEDS:

CEMANI
SHAMO
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The OHIKI 尾曳鶏

Little gnomes and jewels of the garden!

 

Ohiki Page One / Page Two

 


 

Standard for Ohiki (translated from the Japanese)- sent to me by Julia Keeling, Secretary - Asian Hardfeather Club.

OHIKI (O tail, Hiki dragging)

Single Comb,

White Earlobe,

Red-Brown Eye Colour

Weight: cock 937g, hen 750g (young birds 600 750g)

Colour: Red or White Hackled (Black Breasted Red or Red Duckwing and Black Breasted Silver or Siver Duckwing)

Long tail has 30º angle and drags behind

 

The HEAD: The single comb is medium large for the small birds but not masive as in many Chabo lines. The earlobes are a greenish-yellowish white while the birds are moulting and growing new feathers, otherwise they are white with a yellowish cast. The legs are olive-willow green. The illustration below is of an exemplary head and comb. Eye colour is a fiery orange.



The neck hackles are extremely full and long, nearly covering the duckwing triangle on the wings. The saddle hackles varied in different specimens I've seen from long to very long, i.e. touching the ground and dragging ca. five cenitmeters to dragging 15 centimeters. The length of saddles hackles is a very difficult aspect to fix genetically and this variation of length can be seen in all the Longtail Breeds.

 

The illustrations to the left and below show young roosters still in full feather growth. The body form, as can be seen here, is short and stocky. This is not one of my best photographs of Ohiki, as they normally stand prouder and "cockier" with the tail puffed up more. I guess he was a little camera-shy!

 

A very popular breed in Japan, this is the most diminuitive member of the Long Tail breeds native to Japan. It is not a "dwarfed" large breed as the Bantam Phoenix and Bantam Yokohama, but rather a true Dwarf (or Bantam). The colours existing are black breasted red and sliver. The types in Japan range from the typical rounded rump, short-legged, simple-combed, white ear-lobed birds with 60 - 70 cm tails to lines or strains with over 90 to 150 cm tail feathers. The latter is believed to carry more Onagadoir genes. The tail feathers are subtle and slender like the Onagadori and even though I've had Ohiki in my hands on numerous occassions, I have yet to count the tail feathers.

 

A wonderful addition to the Long Tail breeds, new imports of Ohiki are now in England, Germany, Switzerland, Italy and Holland and should soon be showing up in national and international shows. Ohiki is a very calm breed, easy to handle and care for when treated well. They are easy to keep and steal the hearts of many at first sight.

 

There are many directions of Ohiki breeding in Japan. One is more like a bantam Onagadori, with a cumbersomely long train of luxurient feathers. Another line maintains a more manageable length of ca. two and a half to three feet. Take a look for yourself below at these images from Japan. Copyrights are unknown. If you are the owner of the copyrights of these images, please contact me with your wishes.

 

This phenotype is present in a line of birds in Germany, Switzerland and Holland that were hatched out of eggs given to Wolfgang Vits by Knut Roeder. It is a particularly feather-rich line with manageable lengths of 80 - 90 cm tail feathers that can reach to over a meter when single feathers don't moult each year. This line has a much more rounded body form along with larger combs than another phenotype present in Europe todate. This second type has longer body forms and much smaller combs.



Of the two examples below left and right: I have never seen Ohiki with this type of feathering in Europe and am not aware that it has been imported as yet, but it seems much closer to the Onagadori ancestor from which it arose.

 



This illustration above is of the extreme in terms of tail length. To keep this kind of tail length in perfect order, a high level of animal husbandry must be maintained. A beautiful photo from the master poultry photographer Mr Kenjii Kimata.




The shot shown at left is of the father of our main line of birds and displays a very nice length of tail feathers. This bird was already the 2nd generation of Ohiki hatched on German soil from eggs imported from Japan.






       





Ohiki Page One / Page Two



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